Malaria prevention and treatment

 


A bite from a malaria-infected mosquito doesn’t have to be a death sentence — even in a country prone to outbreaks. Your gift will save a life by helping to provide treatment to a sick refugee girl or boy.


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Malaria prevention and treatment

 

Nearly half the world’s population is affected by malaria. Refugees, many of whom are in poor health after walking for miles without food or water to escape violence and persecution, are especially vulnerable. But malaria is preventable and curable — and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is doing everything in its power to treat and protect refugees from this disease.

Current prevention tools, including the use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets, as well as increased availability of treatment for those who are infected, have led to significant progress in stopping the spread of malaria. With continued donor support, UNHCR is committed to creating a malaria-free world.

Young refugee girls during a downpour in South Sudan’s Yusuf Batil refugee camp. Each rainy season, the region becomes a breeding ground for malaria-carrying mosquitos. UNHCR-supported community health workers are trained to recognize the symptoms of malaria — high fever, headache and nausea — and ensure that patients receive lifesaving treatment.

Young refugee girls during a downpour in South Sudan’s Yusuf Batil refugee camp. Each rainy season, the region becomes a breeding ground for malaria-carrying mosquitos. UNHCR-supported community health workers are trained to recognize the symptoms of malaria — high fever, headache and nausea — and ensure that patients receive lifesaving treatment.

Tantine Nsengiyumva, 19, a Burundian refugee, contracted malaria during the first trimester of her pregnancy. Expectant mothers are especially vulnerable to the disease, which is why UNHCR makes sure that Tantine and other pregnant refugees get the treatment they need.

Tantine Nsengiyumva, 19, a Burundian refugee, contracted malaria during the first trimester of her pregnancy. Expectant mothers are especially vulnerable to the disease, which is why UNHCR makes sure that Tantine and other pregnant refugees get the treatment they need.

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We promise to honor your generosity and use your donation in the most effective way possible to help refugees. The catalog items shown reflect periodic surveys of the countries UNHCR operates in and represent both the need and price of critical aid items. Although each item is representative of the gift category in which it appears, donations will be used to provide assistance where it is needed most.

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